[ASC-list] Fwd: The 2009 AAAS Science Dance Contest

Melanie O'Byrne melanie.obyrne at anu.edu.au
Wed Oct 22 23:32:15 UTC 2008


So you think you can research? And dance?

For PhD students, postdocs and professors alike, 
now is your chance to communicate your PhD 
research through interpretive dance in the 2009 
AAAS Science Dance Contest. I kid you not. You 
could win a travel grant and accommodation as an 
honoured guest at next February's AAAS meeting in 
Chicago, and the chance to see professional 
choreographers interpret your peer-reviewed 
research.

Check out the details below, and view some of 
last year's entries for an idea of what not to do.

Cheers
Mel



>---------- Forwarded message ----------
>From: Daniel Poux <dpoux at aaas.org>
>Date: Fri, Oct 17, 2008 at 10:41 AM
>Subject: The 2009 AAAS Science Dance Contest * 
>Submission deadline: 16 November 2008
>
>Are you the sort of scientist who taps her toes while working in the
>laboratory? You look like you're crunching data over there on the computer,
>but you're actually browsing 1980s music videos on YouTube. In fact, doesn't
>your entire scientific career feel like one big 
>dance, like Pina Bausch's *Rite
>of Spring* <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KXVuVQuMvgA>, the Village People
>doing YMCA <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CS9OO0S5w2k>, or maybe Michael
>Jackson dancing with zombies in
>*Thriller*<http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AtyJbIOZjS8>,
>depending on your mood? If so, then your name is written all over this:
>
>Those who saw the results of the first-ever Dance Your
>Ph.D.<http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/319/5865/905b>contest
>know that the human body is an excellent medium for communicating
>science -- perhaps not as data-rich as a peer-reviewed article but far more
>exciting. Since then, e-mails have poured in from scientists around the
>world asking how they can take part in the next event.
>
>For this year's contest, the stage is much larger and the prize is far
>grander. Rather than a single event in a single place, the dance is global.
>
>    1. Make a video of your own Ph.D. dance.
>    2. Post the video on YouTube.
>    3. Not later than 23:00 EST 16 November 2008, e-mail your name, the title
>    of your Ph.D. thesis, and the video URL link to: gonzo at aaas.org .
>
>Once this information is posted on the Dance Contest home
>page<http://gonzolabs.org/dance>,
>you are officially entered in the contest. On 17 November 2008, a total of
>four winners will be chosen from the following categories:
>
>*Graduate Student:* Best among those currently enrolled in a Ph.D. program
>
>*Postdoc:* Best among those who have a Ph.D. but not tenure
>
>*Professor:* Best among those with Ph.D. and tenure
>
>*Popular Choice:* The video with the highest YouTube view count by the
>deadline
>
>*The Prize:* On 17 November 2008, you will provide a single peer-reviewed
>research article on which you are a co-author. (Graduate students who have
>not yet co-authored an article must choose one from their Ph.D. adviser.)
>You will be paired with a professional choreographer. Over the next couple
>of weeks (via e-mail and telephone), you must help your choreographer
>understand your article, its aims, the hypotheses it tests, and its
>big-picture context. Then the four choreographers will collaborate to create
>a single four-part dance based on the winning research articles. Finally,
>you will be an honored guest at the AAAS Annual Meeting in Chicago,
>Illinois, where, on 13 February 2009, you will have front-row seats to the
>world debut of the output -- *THIS IS SCIENCE* -- a contemporary dance
>interpretation of contemporary scientific research. Accommodation in Chicago
>will be provided, and grants are available for travel expenses.
>
>For full details of the contest, visit www.gonzolabs.org.
>
>Best of luck, and I look forward to seeing you in Chicago.
>
>*The Gonzo Scientist*
>
>Daniel Poux
>Associate Director
>Science & Technology Policy Fellowships
>American Association for the Advancement of Science
>1200 New York Avenue, NW
>Washington, DC 20005
>Phone: 202.326.7075
>Fax: 202.289.4950
>dpoux at aaas.org
>www.fellowships.aaas.org

-- 

Melanie O'Byrne
Research School of Earth Sciences
Jaeger 7, Building 61, Mills Road
The Australian National University
Canberra ACT 0200 Australia

T: +61 2 6125 9963
F: +61 2 6257 2737
E: melanie.obyrne at anu.edu.au
W: http://rses.anu.edu.au/gfd

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