[ASC-list] The best in science, innovation and teaching – nominate for the Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science by 28 April

Niall Byrne niall at scienceinpublic.com.au
Wed Apr 20 04:47:22 UTC 2016


Dear ASCers,
You’ve got one more week to help the Australian Government honour Australia’s best scientists, innovators, and science teachers by nominating them for one of the Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science.
This year, the contribution of science to our economy will be explicitly recognised with another new prize: the $50 000 Prize for New Innovators, recognising the commercialisation of early career scientific research.
The new prize joins the $250 000 Prime Minister’s Prize for Innovation, which was first awarded in 2015 to recognise excellence in Australian innovation and research commercialisation.
We’re looking for:

·         Heroes of Australian science who have made a significant contribution to the advancement of knowledge through science – people like Graham Farquhar, Ingrid Scheffer, and Ken Freeman.

·         Exceptional innovators from science and industry who have translated scientific knowledge into substantial commercial impact – like Graeme Jameson’s trillions of bubbles.

·         Early to mid-career scientists whose research is already making, and will continue to have, an impact on our lives – like Angela Moles, Cyrille Boyer, Carola Vinuesa, and Eric May.

·         Science teachers – primary and secondary – like Ken Silburn and Rebecca Johnson, who are inspiring the next generation with a love of science and exploration.
The awards will be presented by the Prime Minister and the Minister for Industry, Innovation and Science, at a gala dinner in the Great Hall of Parliament House, Canberra.
The prizes are:

·         $250 000 Prime Minister’s Prize for Science

·         $250 000 Prime Minister’s Prize for Innovation

·         $50 000 Prize for New Innovators (new in 2016)

·         $50 000 Frank Fenner Prize for Life Scientist of the Year

·         $50 000 Malcolm McIntosh Prize for Physical Scientist of the Year

·         Prime Minister’s Prize for Excellence in Science Teaching in Primary Schools ($50 000 shared between the recipient and their school)

·         Prime Minister’s Prize for Excellence in Science Teaching in Secondary Schools ($50 000 shared between the recipient and their school).
They’ll also receive national recognition, and meet leaders in science, industry, education and government.
Nominations are now open and close at 5.00pm (Canberra time) on Thursday 28 April 2015.
It’s simple to nominate in the first (shortlisting) stage, with an online form which requires:

·         details of the nominator, nominee(s), two supporters

·         for the five science prizes: three external referees (two of whom must be based overseas)

·         an achievement summary of no more than 1000 words

·         a two page curriculum vitae

·         proof of Australian citizenship or permanent residency

·         for the early to mid career awards: evidence that their research career spans no more than 10 years (or full time equivalent) from completion of their highest degree.
If a nomination is shortlisted, further material will be required in the final stage.
For eligibility, selection criteria, nomination guidelines and more examples of past winners, visit: www.science.gov.au/pmscienceprizes<http://www.science.gov.au/pmscienceprizes>
If you have any questions regarding the prizes, please email: pmprizes at questacon.edu.au<mailto:pmprizes at questacon.edu.au>

Last year’s prize recipients
[http://www.scienceinpublic.com.au/wp-content/uploads/Y4A4189-300x200.jpg]Prime Minister’s Prize for Science
Graham Farquhar’s work has transformed our understanding of the world’s most important biological reaction: photosynthesis.  His models of plant biophysics have been used to understand cells, whole plants, whole forests, and to create new water-efficient wheat varieties.  Graham is Distinguished Professor of the Australian National University’s (ANU) Research School of Biology and Chief Investigator of the Australian Research Council’s Centre of Excellence for Translational Photosynthesis.

Prime Minister’s Prize for Innovation
[Graeme Jameson_headshot]Graeme Jameson’s technologies use trillions of bubbles to add nearly $100 billion to the value of Australia’s mineral and energy industries.  He created the Jameson Cell in the 1980s to concentrate base metals such as copper, lead, and zinc. Graeme took flotation; a century old technology developed in Broken Hill and transformed it. A turbulent cloud of minute bubbles are pushed through a slurry of ground- up ore where they pick up mineral particles and carry them to the surface.   The technology found many more applications, most profitably in the Australian coal industry, where the Jameson Cell has retrieved fine export coal particles worth more than $36 billion.  Graeme is Laureate Professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of Newcastle and Director of its Centre for Multiphase Processes.

Frank Fenner Prize for Life Scientist of the Year
Jane Elith is one of the most influential environmental scientists in the world, though she rarely [Jane Elith_headshot] ventures into the field.  She develops and assesses species distribution models, which are used by governments, land and catchment managers, and conservationists around the world—in short, for applying the lessons of ecology.  In Australia for example her models can help farmers restore damaged soils, map the spread of cane toads, and compare the implications of development options in the Tiwi Islands for threatened plants and animals that have largely disappeared from the mainland.  Jane is an Australian Research Council Future Fellow at the University of Melbourne’s School of Biosciences and a member of the Centre of Excellence for Biosecurity Risk Analysis.

Malcolm McIntosh Prize for Physical Scientist of the Year
Associate Professor Cyrille Boyer uses light to make new and complex polymers. His ideas are built on the revolutionary RAFT [Cyrille Boyer_headshot] techniques for which David Solomon and Ezio Rizzardo received the 2011 Prime Minister’s Prize for Science. His latest technology uses light and chlorophyll to catalyse the creation of polymers using up to ten building blocks.  He’s using it to create nanoparticles that can carry drugs into the human body to break down bacterial biofilms associated with implants, cystic fibrosis, and sticky ear.  His patented technologies will herald a new era of smart polymers and eventually he believes he will be able to reconstruct complex polymers such as proteins and even DNA.  Cyrille is an Australian Research Council Future Fellow in the School of Chemical Engineering at the University of New South Wales.

Prime Minister’s Prize for Excellence in Science Teaching in Primary Schools

[Rebecca Johnson_headshot]Fifteen years ago Rebecca Johnson, from Windaroo State School, initiated a new method for teaching science more effectively in primary schools without costing the government anything extra. With a fully resourced science room Rebecca, with her teaching partner, teach science to every student at Windaroo State School. Because of this designated space and the importance that has been assigned to this subject area, the children are able to experience a depth of science learning usually reserved for high school.

Prime Minister’s Prize for Excellence in Science Teaching in Secondary Schools

[Kenneth Silburn_headshot]Ken Siburn has transformed science teaching at Casula High School in Sydney’s south-western suburbs. Two-thirds of Year 11 and 12 students choose science subjects thanks to his work. Ken has transformed the way his students engage with science, through extension programs, interactive and hands-on activities, and a great deal of encouragement. In the classroom, Ken focuses on what his students are most interested in or fascinated by, and makes it a big part of his science teaching curriculum. A highlight is the use of space science as a core element of the classes.
Read more about past prize recipients at: www.science.gov.au/pmscienceprizes<http://www.science.gov.au/pmscienceprizes>
Regards,
________

Niall Byrne

Creative Director
Science in Public
82 Hudsons Road, Spotswood VIC 3015
PO Box 2076 Spotswood VIC 3015
03 9398 1416, 0417 131 977

niall at scienceinpublic.com.au<mailto:niall at scienceinpublic.com.au>
Twitter scienceinpublic
Full contact details at www.scienceinpublic.com.au<http://www.scienceinpublic.com.au/>

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